Steven Hayes Wants To Die

Steven Hayes and Joshua Komisarjevsky broke into the home of the Petit family in July 2007.  The only survivor from the attack on the family was  Dr. William Petit, Jr.  who was beaten with a baseball bat and left to die in the basement.  Steven Hayes raped and strangled Dr. Petit’s wife, and the daughters Haley and Michaela were assaulted, restrained, and doused with gasoline.  They died in the fire of smoke inhalation.

It is a case that many followed and when both defendants were convicted and sentenced to death for the murders, many breathed a sigh of relief that these men would never walk the streets a free man ever again.  I am very much torn when it comes to the death penalty.   There are definitely cases that are so egregious and horrific that cause me to yell “Take them to the gallows!”, but at the end of the day I question the absolute right of government to exact death.  I’m really not sure how I feel about the death penalty and it is a subject that causes much turmoil when discussed.

Steven Hayes was sentenced to death for his crimes and has been sitting in a Connecticut prison for years.  He has recently declared that he wishes to waive direct appeal and go straight to the death chamber.  Why is he ready to call it a day?

“I cannot live with the intense tourcher [sic], torment, harrassment, and the resulting psychological trauma dished out by the Dept. of Corr. staff here at Northern.” (October 11, 2012)

He cannot live with the torture and harassment of the Department of Corrections.  He cannot take another day of the psychological trauma being dished out to him behind the prison walls.  I wonder if Hayes thinks of the psychological trauma that Dr. Petit endures and will continue to endure for the rest of his life because he and his co-defendant killed off his family?

In this instance, I’m not feeling much sympathy for Steven Hayes and if he wants to check out, perhaps the State will oblige him quickly.

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20 Comments

  1. nuggett

    I feel there should be no death row inmates as soon as they are convicted by a jury of there peers they should be exicuted.There should be several ways to put them to death for these crimes.It should be either chosen by a lottery system or a wheel of punishment.Spin the wheel what ever it stops on hanging,firing squad,lethal injection,electrocution. enjoy yourself you have 1 hr to live.They should also be telivised so people can see if you commit a terrible crime this is what will happen to you

    Reply
    1. MisGhrist

      I absolutely agree with this. I with all my heart believe in an ” eye for an eye”.. As humans we have choices, decisions to make. Not always easy, but we make them everyday. I believe there are consequences to every action. My daughter was molested at the age of 4. He was someone we loved and thought to be family. He never thought about what he was doing and how it would impact, her, our family, and even his own family.. Steven Hayes made a decision that day, he knew the consequences, he never thought to think about how it would be for everyone left behind. I say we pour gas on him and light that sucker sky high… I have no sympathy for people like this. Innocent children murdered and its supposed to be “ol poor him, and his psychological troubles”…. Hell no. No one should be treated the way he treated that family.. I’m sorry but I hope they let him die sooner rather than later. As for televising it, sounds to me like a good after school special.. “THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU HARM OTHERS”!! Bet you a lot less kids would be in juvenile detention…

      Reply
      1. prinnie (Post author)

        I have no compassion for child molesters and think that they are given way too many chances to redeem themselves – at the expense of their innocent victims. They can never be fixed and most always reoffend. There are evil people in the world and while my emotions get carried away on a lot of these cases, I just don’t know that I could be the one to pull the switch. Could I cheer on the executioner? I’m not sure about that either, but absolutely there must be punishment that fits the crime.

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      2. Elizabeth

        You say you believe in “an eye for an eye” yet you do not understand it at all…it is a directive to LIMIT revenge, not aggressively seek it or enact it. Go read more than just that line, read pages before and after it to understand God’s entire message….this is pretty basic, but so many mis-interpret and mis-understand this line, it’s really a shame to pervert it’s intended direction and meaning.

        Reply
  2. Joaps

    I completely disagree with you on all counts. Think of all the people who are found guilty by a jury of their own peers but are really innocent of any crime. Such as Damien Echols one of the “West Memphis 3” He spent 17 years on death row for a crime he did not commit. A crime that had absolutely no evidence proving any of these 3 boys were guilty. Just because a jury finds a person guilty, it doesn’t always mean they are guilty. The system is flawed. You have jury tampering, crooked judges, crooked prosecutors and politics plays a huge role in cases. Personally, I don’t agree with the death penalty not as it stands today. Not with such a flawed system. Unless you can make it perfect and assure innocent people don’t die, then the death penalty should never be used.

    As for televising them, I can’t even imagine why someone would want to see another put to death.

    Reply
    1. prinnie (Post author)

      That’s where I have a problem, too Joaps. Emotion gets the best of me on some of the facts of the cases and the gut reaction is OMG! DIE!, but especially in cases such as the West Memphis 3. They were innocent and found guilty not on evidence but COERCED testimony.

      Reply
  3. Joaps

    Just want to add I am not defending this murderer! I say let him suffer in prison. Death is the easy way out.

    Reply
  4. nuggett

    let me say this so as not to confuse anyone.If without a doubt a person is guilty of a crime proven guilty by evidence and witnesses and sentenced to death.Then they should be exicuted within a certain time period.

    Reply
    1. Amy

      The Innocence Project exonerated 18 people last year. That’s 18 people who were proven guilty by evidence beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law and duly sentenced by our legal system. 18 people, just in the last year, proven innocent by just one organization reevaluating their cases. In each of those cases, there were jurors and prosecutors and witnesses who were convinced of their guilt. Who do you propose be the authority to determine which people convicted by our legal system are guilty “without a doubt” such that we can kill them?

      Reply
  5. Mama Goose

    This is one of those crimes that are so horrible, I’ll never forget it. Steven Hayes can’t live with the torture he receives in prison? Well Steve-O, what about the Petit women that you and Josh K tortured and murdered? They didn’t have a choice to live or die, did they?

    What about the torture Dr Petit lives with everyday? He has a choice to live or die, he chose to live and honor his family with The Petit Foundation. Dr Petit also remarried recently. I wish he and his new wife nothing but love & happiness. He will never have his beloved family back, i but hopefully through his new marriage he can find even a tiny bit of closure. May he heal even more and fight monsters like you.

    Grant this POS his request. Why waste anymore money on him?

    Reply
    1. prinnie (Post author)

      I think if he wants to die his request should be granted. Again, the death penalty issue is one that is really centers on our personal moral fiber. Just want to remind everyone that we may have differing opinions on it, but please respect the opinion of others who don’t agree with your personal opinion. I know it’s hard not to get passionate about these types of issues, but we are all entitled to our opinion — even if it’s unpopular.

      Reply
  6. Rudi Stettner

    Hayes’ wishes mean nothing to me.He deserves no say in how long he is to live, or how and if he will be put to death by the state. The Petit family had no control over their last hours on earth. He deserves the same level of control over his person, his surroundings and his future. Any sort of medical care should be witheld from him, such as medication, dental work or anal reconstructive surgery. Furthermore, he should be charged for the time of the court that he has wasted in filing motions on his own behalf

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  7. Boris Badenov

    These are such difficult issues. Every now and then, there appears a poster child for the death penalty. Truly evil monsters for whom there is no doubt of there guilt. But in the end, it is not so difficult. It is not possible to apply the death penalty to the Hayes of the world without applying it to less clear cases. The problem is that as humans, we cannot perform any task with perfection. Whether it is launching a space shuttle with out blowing up or performing neurosurgery on the correct side or even patient. The price we will pay for the execution of Steven Hayes is the chance of executing an innocent. That makes us no better than them. In addition, when we execute an innocent, there is a guilty that goes free. And as OJ Simpson showed us, enough money can get the guilty off scott free to search the golf courses of Florida for the real killer. And, as a previous poster pointed out, this monster prefers the easy exit of a barbiturate induced coma over a tortured life behind bars. This animal deserves to life a long life filled with one day after endless day to be reminded of the horror of his crime.

    Reply
    1. prinnie (Post author)

      And that’s where I find myself torn. The emotional part of me demands justice, but at what cost?

      Reply
  8. Jeff Field

    Prinnie,The emotional part is exactly the problem. On July 3, 1997 6 year old Elizabeth Knapp of the tiny town of Hopkinton, NH was brutally raped and suffocated to death in her bed. The state, to nothing of this tiny hamlet in rural NH, had never seen such a horrific act, perpetrated on the most innocent and vulnerable…a six year old child. Her mother told the investigators that she witnessed her live in boyfriend (Richard Buchanon) of five years in the act. She even went on to say that she saw him dragging the girl around by her hair. Her statement seemed irrefutable. The State felt that the only charge that would stand up was second degree murder due to the circumstance. This monster would escape the ultimate penalty. Virtually everyone in the State was outraged at this. If ever there was a case that would demand the death penalty, this was it. The crime was one of the worst ever seen in the State and the evidence was overwhelming. Who could doubt the credibility of an eye witness who had known the perpetrator for five years and lived under the same roof with him. Even the then Governor, Jeanne Shaheen expressed her outrage that Buchanon would get away with his life. There was one minor problem. He didn’t do it. The semen found on the girl’s body was shown by DNA analysis to belong to neighbor Jimmy Dale, who was ultimately convicted of the crime and is serving 60 years in the NH State Prison. Buchanon spent six months in jail before he was exonerated. He had to spend that time in solitary confinement due to the risk of letting him mix with the general population. Shaheen agitated for a change in the New Hampshire death penalty to allow for, among other things, death for the murder of anyone under the age of thirteen. Had this crime occured ten years earlier with Shaheen’s proposed reforms in place, there is little doubt that Buchanon would have been executed for a crime he did not commit. It is the most heinous of crimes that are apt to provoke us to abandon logic and reason in favor of an emotional “somebody’s got to pay” response. That is not the mark of a civil society.

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  9. Mariana

    This is EXACTLY why he should stay in prison and remain alive…so he CAN be psychologically trauma and being “tormented” by the CT Department of Corrections.
    Although he should eventually be put to death for the brutal and heinous nature of his crime…right now he needs to suffer more on this earth for murdering and raping Mrs. Petit and her daughters and for leaving Dr. Petit for dead.

    Reply
  10. BB

    Exactly Mariana. Death is the easy way out for this guy. Let him live to be 90 and suffer every minute of every day.

    Reply
  11. zoebrain

    Dr Petit was one of the few medical practitioners who helped Intersex and Trans people like me.
    When he became psychologically disabled due to sheer mental agony, a number of people like me died as the direct result.

    I do not hate easily, but these two are #1 on my hate list. A fault in me that the list isn’t empty.
    I am fortunate that it was not in my power to do to them what my very creative imagination would like to do, as that would make me a monster like them.

    “The right to be free of cruel and unusual punishments, like the other guarantees of the Bill of Rights, may not be submitted to vote; it depends on the outcome of no elections. The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials and to establish them as legal principles to be applied by the courts.” — Furman v. Georgia, 408 U.S. 238, 269 (1972)

    “To incarcerate, society takes from prisoners the means to provide for their own needs. Prisoners are dependent on the State for food, clothing, and necessary medical care. A prison’s failure to provide sustenance for inmates “may actually produce physical ‘torture or a lingering death.’” Just as a prisoner may starve if not fed, he or she may suffer or die if not provided adequate medical care. A prison that deprives prisoners of basic sustenance, including adequate medical care, is incompatible with the concept of human dignity and has no place in civilized society. ” – SCOTUS

    It is this case that tests my ethics most sorely. Do I follow my own moral code, or do I visit on them just 1/1000 of what they so richly deserve?

    .
    Frodo: [telepathically] If you ask it of me, I will give you the One Ring.
    Galadriel: You offer it to me freely? I do not deny that my heart has greatly desired this.
    [starts to grow dark]
    Galadriel: In the place of a Dark Lord you would have a Queen! Not dark but beautiful and terrible as the Morn! Treacherous as the Seas! Stronger than the foundations of the Earth! All shall love me and despair!
    [she stops]
    Galadriel: I have passed the test. I will diminish, and go into the West, and remain Galadriel.

    I have passed the test. Imprison them for life, No special treatment, for good or ill.

    Not for their benefit, but for mine. For society’s. So we remain civilised.

    You have NO IDEA how hard that is for me to write.

    Reply
  12. camelia

    I have a suggestion. To make sure no innocent person is put to death, I suggest that anyone that is convicted of 2 seperate murders, rapes, or horrific crime against a helpless person ( child, elderly, mentally incapacitated)be put to death. People that pray on others seldomly do it once. After they are found guilty the second time like many are they should be schedule of termination the next morning. They should have their bologna sandwich and coke or what ever the other inmates have for dinner and they should spend the rest of their night in their cell alone. In the morning they should be taken to the electric chair or what ever the method may be and issued last rights if they would like to receive them. Then they should die. They should be buried or donated to science or what ever human way to dispose of their corpse. The end. You may be wrongly convicted once. But twice in different crimes by different peers. I think that would atleast cut down on a huge part of the burden to society.
    If you are on death row for only one crime and you become fatally injured or terminally ill your execution should be scheduled asap. We should not waste millions of dollars treating their illness or injury. Just think of the billions of dollars that could be saved by doing this. Billions that could be used to better our nation. Feed our hungry children. Medicate our elderly so they don’t have to chose between their medications or their food for the month.

    Reply
  13. FatFreddy

    Thanks to Prinnie for trying to approach these issues seriously and with gravity.

    To the people who want this man to suffer, I hope you’ll reconsider. As emotionally satisfying as it may appear from a distance, torturing another person corrodes your own soul, and condoning or it wanting it does the same thing. That is not the merciful or just way. We are very sad the victims suffered, yes. But let us not add to the suffering in this world if we can help it.

    To the people who say putting this man to death makes us no different than him, you should recognize that not all killing is “murder”. Murder is an unlawful or unjust killing. Sometimes killing is the right thing to do. The commandment in the Bible, correctly translated, does not say “Thou shalt not kill” – it says “Thou shalt not murder”.

    Also, not all killing is cruel. Putting this man to death is the merciful and just action in this case. He knows it, and so do we, if we take the time to reflect. Killing him not only puts him out of his misery, it puts him out of our misery. That’s more important than he is, in this case.

    An “eye for an eye” is indeed the correct prescription here. He killed unlawfully; and he himself should be killed – swiftly, mercifully, and lawfully. That is as much justice as can ever be acheived in this imperfect world.

    Reply

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